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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
in tunisia; fleeing the violence in syria and delaying a decision on gay scouts. but first, with the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a new round of fighting broke out today in damascus, syria-- the heaviest in weeks. rebel fighters made a thrust toward the central part of the capital, and smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build
stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban on openly gay members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in august. under the plan, post offices already open on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on satu
. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters, who say he received repeated death
week one of the men who helped bring rule to an end in tunisia was assassinated and france continues operations against al-qaeda and extremists in nearby mali. in egypt, there's growing opposition to president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in syria the civil war continues and it's gotten more complex in the wake of israeli air strikes to keep damascus from shifting weapons to nearby lebanon. here to help explain recrenate vents is jon alterman the director of the mideast program at the center for strategic and international studies. sir, thank you for joining us. >> good to be with you. >> so let's start. in north africa we have recent events in tunisia and we have the french operations in mali which least initially appear successful and scattering the al-qaeda elements and separating them from the tuareg and insurgents. how's the united states need to deal with this in a broad way? does it need to be getting involved in both mali and more broadly in the region? what do we need to be doing? >> if you're talking about intervention mali it's a question of what you're tryin
the dozens of abandoned airplanes at the country's airport. >> the ruling party of tunisia has projected its own prime minister's decision to dissolve the government. there is a homecoming of shokri belaid's remains. they predict the dissolution of parliament announced by its own prime minister. the assassination has sparked mass protests in several major cities. now this report. >> the people here are pretty much aware of the implications of the assassination and the uncertainty that looms over the country. this is by the political establishment yesterday had a quick fix the problem. prime minister hamdi jebali said that he offered the technocratic government, refusing -- saying the offer to dissolve the government. the party says that it rejects a technocratic offer and they intend to stay in power. the other opposition parties want to include everyone in the talks and they don't want a democratic government. >> an inquiry by australia's top criminal investigation leaders has found widespread doping in professional sport. links to organized crime and the possibility of a match fixing. scan
is on edge today. riot police in egypt and tunisia, bracing for more violence. protests have been happening there as you can see after friday prayers following the assassination after popular opposition leader in tunisia. remember, that was the birthplace of the arab spring two years ago. fox's's conor powell is live from jerusalem. conor, do we know why this tunisian opposition leader was murdered? >> reporter: he was an outspoken critic of the ruling muslim brotherhood party in tunisia. he was a leading figure in the arab spring revolution two years ago. on wednesday he was gunned down by an unknown assailant in front of his house. recently a muslim cleric in tunisia called for a -- his supporters turned out in thousands for his death. blamed the ruling muslim government for his death. although the tunisia prime minister denies it. he promised a full investigation and to catch those responsible for the murder. alisyn: do we have answer wlormt this assassination will spark more violence? >> reporter: we've already seen three days of violence and protest in tunisia and clashes with the poli
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)